Updated feedback from Monica (6-10-10)

Two of three approved! Waiting on the last one. :) - Raihan

DUE: Friday, May 21st, by 3:30pm

Share an article by Wednesday, May 19th by midnight (11:59pm)

Look at and comment on the articles by Thursday, May 20th by midnight (11:59pm)

Instructions: Checkpoint 3: Research Articles In the box provided please ATTACH the following items:

  • A Word document with three reference citations of peer-reviewed empirical research articles. These citations must be in correct APA formatting including the correct items italicized, correct order of authors, and the correct usage of periods/commas.
  • You must attach the PDF (or other saved format) of each of the three articles cited.

You may attach more than 3 articles if you feel one or more may not be empirical research. However, each one must be cited in correct APA formatting. Only one submission may be made per group. Refer to Module 5 for specific information on finding research articles in peer-reviewed journals.

RESEARCH ARTICLES:
ACCEPTED
Research Article:
Sub Topic: Stranger Danger


Title: “A Preliminary Evaluation of Two Behavioral Skills Training Procedures for Teaching Abduction-Prevention Skills to Schoolchildren”

Found at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1389609/?tool=pmcentrez

Synopsis: Although child abduction is a low-rate event, it presents a serious threat to the safety of children. The victims of child abduction face the threat of physical and emotional injury, sexual abuse, and death. Previous research has shown that behavioral skills training (BST) is effective in teaching children abduction-prevention skills, although not all children learn the skills. This study compared BST only to BST with an added in situ training component to teach abduction-prevention skills in a small-group format to schoolchildren. Results showed that both programs were effective in teaching abduction-prevention skills. In addition, the scores for the group that received in situ training were significantly higher than scores for the group that received BST alone at the 3-month follow-up assessment.

Citation:


Johnson, B., Miltenberger, R., Knudson, P., Egemo-Helm, K., Kelso, P., Jostad, C., et al. (2006). A preliminary evaluation of two behavioral skills training procedures for teaching abduction-prevention skills to schoolchildren. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 39(1), 25-34. doi:10.1901/jaba.2006.167-04.

(Monique's Article)


ACCEPTED
Sub Topic: Home Safety

Title: Mothers’ Home-Safety Practices for Preventing Six Types of Childhood Injuries: What Do They Do, and Why?

Found at: http://jpepsy.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/29/4/285

Synopsis: In general, parents know the safety measures that need to be taken in order to provide safety for their children in the home. However, even knowing what is right and what is wrong, parents tend to disregard teaching their children precautious measures of injury prevention in the home, even though they should take active measures in safety-promotion. This article focuses on the most common child injuries in the homes: falls, poisoning, drowning, cuts, burns, and suffocation/strangulation/choking.

Citation: Morrongiell, B.A., & Kiriakou, S. (2003). Mothers’ home-safety practices for preventing six types of childhood injuries: what do they do, and why?. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 29(4), 285-297. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsh030

-Yoonnie



Updated/Additional Research Articles that Fit the Requirements..


Sub Topic: Traffic Safety

Title: Active Transportation to School: Trends Among U.S. Schoolchildren, 1969-2001

Found at:

Synopsis: This is a study of the data that was collected during the National Personal Transportation Survey. The data revolves around who travels in the U.S., how far they travel, why the travel, etc. It might not be an official "empirical" article because the author herself did not collect the data; however, it is an analysis in data that was collected by an official agency.

Citation: McDonald, N. C. (2007). Active transportation to school: Trends among U.S. schoolchildren, 1969-2001. American Journal of Preventive Medecine, 32(6), 509-516. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2007.02.022

-Raihan


Sub Topic: Traffic Safety

Title: Evaluation of Traffic Crash Fatality Causes and Effects

Found at:

Synopsis: This is a big huge packet of data and evaluation of the data on traffic crash fatalities as collected and published by the Florida Department of Transportation.

Citation: Spainhour, L. K., Brill, D., Sobanjo, J., Wekezer, J., Mtenga, P. (2005). Evaluation of traffic crash fatality causes and effects: A study of fatal traffic crashes in Florida from 1998-2000 focusing on heavy truck crashes, BD-050. Tallahassee, Florida: Florida Department of Transportation. Retrieved from http://www.dot.state.fl.us/research-center/Completed_Proj/Summary_SF/FDOT_BD050_rpt.pdf

-Raihan


Sub Topic: Stranger Danger

Title: Investigating Potential Child Abduction Cases: A Developmental Perspective

Found at:

Synopsis: The first article in this publication gives some great info on what kinds of children are abducted and why.

Citation: Lord, W. D., Boudreaux, M. C., Lanning, K. V. (2001). Investigating potential child abduction cases: A developmental perspective. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 70(4), 1-10. Retrieved from http://www.fbi.gov/publications/leb/2001/apr01leb.pdf

-Raihan


Sub Topic: Stranger Danger

Title: Examining Child Abduction by Offender Type Patterns

Found at:

Synopsis: This article is an analysis of nearly 700 abduction cases in South Carolina for patterns and trends. The article discusses what kinds of kids are abducted, what kinds of adults are the abductors, when abductions are the most likely to occur, and where abductions are the most likely to occur.

Citation: Miller, J. M., Kurlycheck, M., Hansen, J. A., Wildon, K. (2008). Examining child abduction by offender type patterns. Justice Quarterly, 25(3), 523-543. doi: 10.1080/07418820802241697

-Raihan


Sub Topic: Poison Control

Title: Hazardous Chemical Incidents in Schools - United States, 2002-2007

Found at:

Synopsis: This article is more like a research report than an empirical article, although it is written by CDC officials on data that was collected by an associated organization, the Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance system of the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. This report has some good info about the prevalence of chemical accidents in elementary and secondary schools.

Citation: Centers for Disease control and Prevention (CDC). (2008). Hazardous chemical instances in schools - United States, 2006-2007. Journal of the American Medical Association, 300(24), 2849-2850. doi: 10.1001/jama.300.24.2849

-Raihan


Sub Topic: Poison Control

Title: Parental Poison Prevention Practices and Their Relationship with Perceived Toxicity: Cross-Sectional Study

Found at: *the wiki stopped letting me upload files, so here's the URL where you can download it*
http://uh7qf6fd4h.search.serialssolutions.com/?genre=article&isbn=&issn=13538047&title=Injury+Prevention&volume=14&issue=6&date=20081201&atitle=Parental+poison+prevention+practices+and+their+relationship+with+perceived+toxicity%3a+cross-sectional+study.&aulast=Patel%2c+B.&pages=389-395&sid=EBSCO:Academic+Search+Premier&pid=


Synopsis: This article discusses a study that asked caregivers about their opinions and practices with toxic household substances, including everything from cough medicine to turpentine.

Citation: Patel, B., Groom, L., Prasad, V., Kendrick, D. (2008). Parental poison prevention practices and their relationship with perceived toxicity: cross-sectional study. Injury Prevention, 14, 389-395. doi: 10.1136/ip.2008.019604

-Raihan


Sub Topic: Poison Control

Title: Parental Poison Prevention Practices and Their Relationship with Perceived Toxicity: Cross-Sectional Study

Found at: *the wiki stopped letting me upload files, so here's the URL where you can download it*
http://uh7qf6fd4h.search.serialssolutions.com/?genre=article&isbn=&issn=00014575&title=Accident+Analysis+%26+Prevention&volume=41&issue=5&date=20090901&atitle=Recognition+of+home+injury+risks+by+novice+parents+of+toddlers.&aulast=Gaines%2c+Joanna&pages=1070-1074&sid=EBSCO:Academic+Search+Premier&pid=


Synopsis: This article discusses the ability of new parents of toddlers, health care providers, and day care providers to identify hazards in a mock bedroom, living room, and bathroom. Turns out, parents did the best, but everyone found less than 50% of the hazards.

Citation: Gaines, J., Schwebel, D. C. (2009). Recognition of home injury risks by novice parents of toddlers. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 41, 1170-1074. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2009.06.010

-Raihan


Sub Topic: Street Safety

Title: Child Pedestrian Safety: Parental Supervision, Modeling Behaviors, and Beliefs about Child Pedestrian Competence

Found at: *the wiki stopped letting me upload files, so here's the URL where you can download it*
http://uh7qf6fd4h.search.serialssolutions.com/?genre=article&isbn=&issn=00014575&title=Accident+Analysis+%26+Prevention&volume=41&issue=5&date=20090901&atitle=Child+pedestrian+safety%3a+Parental+supervision%2c+modeling+behaviors%2c+and+beliefs+about+child+pedestrian+competence.&aulast=Morrongiello%2c+Barbara+A.&pages=1040-1046&sid=EBSCO:Academic+Search+Premier&pid=


Synopsis: This article discusses exactly what the title says. Lol. According to the study, a lot of parents think traffic safety is important, but they fail to explicitly teach it to their children. They also tend to teach boys more often than girls.

Citation: Morrongiello, B. A., Barton, B. K. (2008). Child pedestrian safety: Parental supervision, modeling behaviors, and beliefs about child pedestrian competence. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 41, 1040-1046. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2009.06.017

-Raihan


Sub Topic: Stranger Danger

Title: Effects of an Intruder Crisis Drill on Children's Knowledge, Anxiety, and Perceptions of School Safety

Found at: *the wiki stopped letting me upload files, so here's the URL where you can download it*
http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=34&hid=14&sid=04ea707e-b2e1-49db-af4d-040065eaabe2%40sessionmgr4


Synopsis: This article discusses exactly what the title says. Results showed that the lesson and drill were effective in increasing students' knowledge but didn't change their emotional reaction to the drill.

Citation: Zhe, E. J., Nickerson, A. B. (2007). Effects of an intruder crisis drill on children's knowledge, anxiety, and perceptions of school safety. School Psychology Review, 36(3), 501-508. Retrievable from http://www.nasponline.org/publications/spr/sprmain.aspx

-Raihan


Sub Topic: Street Safety

Title: Lasting Effects of Short-Term Training on Preschoolers' Street-Crossing Behavior

Found at: *the wiki stopped letting me upload files, so here's the URL where you can download it*
http://uh7qf6fd4h.search.serialssolutions.com/?genre=article&isbn=&issn=00014575&title=Accident+Analysis+%26+Prevention&volume=42&issue=2&date=20100301&atitle=Lasting+effects+of+short-term+training+on+preschoolers%E2%80%99+street-crossing+behavior.&aulast=Albert%2c+Rachel+R.&pages=500-508&sid=EBSCO:Academic+Search+Premier&pid=


Synopsis: This is a very recent article that discusses the benefits and lasting effects of using stories, songs, or games to teach kids traffic safety. There was a very high retention of the material and of the behaviors after 6 months.

Citation**: Albert, R. R., Dolgin, K. G. (2010). Lasting effects of short-term training on preschoolers' street-crossing behavior. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 42, 500-508. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2009.09.014

-Raihan


Annnnnnnnd... these two were accepted as empirical articles:

Morrongiello, B.A., & Kiriakou, S. (2006). Evaluation of the effectiveness of single-session school-based programmes to increase children’s seat belt and pedestrian safety knowledge and self-reported behaviors. International Journal of Control and Safety Promotion, 13(1), 15-25. doi: 10.1080/17457300500151770
Timpe, E. M., Wuller, W. R., & Karpinski, J. P. (2008). A regional poison prevention education service-learning project. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 72(4), 1-6. Retrievable from http://www.ajpe.org/volsIssues/issueViewer.asp?vol=74&issue=04&YR=2008

And now for the final one:
McComas, J., MacKay, M., & Pivik, J. (2002). Effectiveness of virtual reality for teaching pedestrian safety. Cyber Psychology & Behavior, 5(3), 185-190. Retrieved from http://www.liebertonline.com/cpb